Top 10 Crops To Grow On A Trellis

Save space by growing plants vertically on a trellis is what the article quoted below is all about. Of course it is perfectly true that the amount of vegetation growing on a trellis would take up far more space at ground level, but that conveniently ignores the fact that these plants are climbers that need to grow vertically. Be that as it may this useful list comes from an article by Emma Smizer which I found on the Shareably website.

If you?re looking to conserve space in your garden, try vertical trellis gardening! This article will help you choose the best crops for vertical gardening and how to grow them in your own backyard.

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Source: Rodale’s Organic Life

1. ?Lazy Wife? Pole Beans

Despite its name, these beans are anything but lazy. This variety of pole bean is known for its large amount and continuous string of production. Once these beans start, you can hardly get them to stop. After planting your seeds, secure a trellis tripod over the area to give the vines support. After 80 days, your vines should be mature enough to start producing beans.

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Source: Rodale’s Organic Life

2. ?Orient Express? Cucumber

There are actually quite a few varieties of cucumber, and this one, called the ?orient express?, is known to do well on a trellis. This veggie is famous for its tender skin and is ready to eat straight from the vine, no peeling required. These cucumbers can be ready for harvest in as little as 60 days, so be sure to keep an eye out.

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Source: Rodale’s Organic Life

3. ?Dr. Martin?s? Pole Lima Beans

This bean gets its name from a dentist, Doctor Martin, who also was a talented botanist. Thanks to the good doctor, we now have one of the largest varieties of Lima beans today. These vines can grow up to 12ft tall and need plenty of support, so make sure you use thicker poles for your trellis. Make sure to plant in well-drained soil and regularly harvest to get more beans.

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Source: Rodale’s Organic Life

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Feature photo: Friends of Cora Garden