THESE ARE THE BEST BERRY PLANTS FOR BIRDS

Watching birds in the garden is one of life’s pleasures so it makes sense to have plants that will attract and also feed them through the winter. Birds feast on berries or to be more precise they need the berries to enable them to survive. I found this slideshow which illustrates nineteen berry bearing shrubs. This has been composed by Marty Ross and Justin W Hancock and is from the Better Homes and Gardens website.

Feeding birds comes naturally when you grow trees and shrubs with nutritious berries. The plants you’ll find in this slideshow do double duty: They attract birds and create a beautiful display with their flowers, fall colors, and fruits adding sparkle to your landscape.

American Cranberry Viburnum

American cranberry bush viburnum (Viburnum trilobum) is a handsome shrub that has white springtime flowers, maple-shape leaves that turn bright colors in autumn, and red fall berries. Brown Thrashers, Cedar Waxwings, and other birds feast on the long-lasting fruits, which serve birds well in tough winters. It grows 8-12 feet tall and wide but can be kept smaller with pruning. Zones 2-7

Red-Twig Dogwood

A standout in winter because of its bold red stems, red-twig dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) also features clusters of small white flowers in spring, white fruits in summer and fall, and bold red-orange autumn color. It grows 6 feet tall and is native to areas of North America. Zones 2-8

Chokeberry

Brown Thrashers are fond of chokeberries (Aronia arbutifolia) and so are Cedar Waxwings and other songbirds. It grows 6-10 feet tall in sun or part shade and tolerates moist and dry sites. It spreads by suckering and is a good choice for a hedge. This shrub is indigenous to areas of North America. Zones 4-9

Wahoo

A North American native counterpart to burning bush, wahoo (Euonymus atropurpureus) likes a moist, sunny spot. It produces bright scarlet berries in autumn. It bears red fall color and makes for an attractive informal hedge. Wahoo grows 20 feet tall. Zones 3-7

See more at Better Homes and Gardens
Image source: Mr.TinDC