HOW TO CREATE FREE CLEMATIS VINES FROM CUTTINGS

The Clematis vine is one of my favorite climbing plants. There are three basic types that bloom at different times. The first flowers in early Spring and is followed by the summer bloomer. The third takes up the rear and completes the season with late blooms which means that by careful choice of plants you can have continuous flowers nearly all year. There is a huge range of colors and flower shapes making this an ideal vine for many different locations. And once you have purchased your first plant you can increase your stock by taking cuttings. I came across an article by Melissa Will on her Empress of Dirt website which contains full instructions.

If you have a clematis vine you love (or a friend does), this tip shows you how to take cuttings to create more vines?that?s what propagation is. It?s a great way to get free plants without much effort.
I?ll walk you through the steps so you can propagate your vines this spring.

Free Plants from the Ones you Have

Propagate! Propagate! Propagate! That?s what I say when people ask how to get lots of plants without spending much money. Of course you first need to know what ?propagation? means. For plants, it really just means growing more plants from existing plants. And when it comes to clematis, it?s simple and you?ll save a lot of money.

How To Propagate Clematis

  • To successfully propagate clematis, you?ll need an established vine (two years or older) to take cuttings from.
  • If you don?t know what?s possible, check out all these varieties on Amazon.
  • This works best in late spring.

SUPPLIES

  • Two-year old+ clematis vine.
  • Plastic bag with tablespoon of water.
  • 3? pot with good quality potting soil.
  • Rooting hormone.?
  • Sharp cutting knife and cutting board.
  • Plastic ziplock bag large enough for container/pot.

STEPS 1. Get a 3-foot cutting from an existing clematis vine. Snip it off just above a leaf joint.

  • Look at the vine. You?ll notice that the shoots of the vine are very green where the growth is new. As the vine ages, it becomes woody and the colour is deeper, perhaps brown. The piece you cut will be green at the tips and woody where you cut it.
  • I carry a plastic bag with some water in it and put the freshly cut end in the water until I?m ready for Step 2.

Clematis cutting in bag - How to grow clematis from cuttings. If you have a clematis vine you love (or a friend does), this tip shows you how to take cuttings to create more vines?that's what propagation is. It's a great way to get free plants without much effort. I'll walk you through the steps so you can propagate your vines this spring.

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