Top 10 Flowers for Fall Color

While we are fast approaching winter there is still time to enjoy the autumnal colors of gold, orange, purple and red. If your fall flowers have faded use this to look back at some of the top performers of this season and also as ideas to help you plan for next year. I came across this list on the Garden Lovers Club website.

As an individual who loves having flowers in bloom around my home, I need more than flowers that bloom in the spring and summer in my garden. Fall blooming flowers are lovely, and they typically produce deep jewel toned blooms of purple, rust orange, and scarlet red. I have created this guide with some of my favorite fall bloomers to help your garden look amazing this year. Let’s take a look:

1. Oxeye Sunflower

oxeye-sunflower

This plant is known as a “false sunflower” because it possesses the same yellow petals and brown centered bloom that you see on sunflowers, but these blooms occur late in the summer and continue throughout the fall months of the year. For perky blooms, this plant needs full sun for at least four or five hours a day. The plant should be grown in well-drained soil, and it should be watered when the top of the soil feels dry.

2. Goldenrod

goldenrod

Many view goldenrod as a pretty weed that is often seen in fields or areas outside of our garden. This plant produces yellow blooms that make a great contrast to any fall garden, and it will spread on its own to create a beautiful ground covering. There are several varieties to choose from, so if you want a goldenrod with less of a spread, try the “fireworks” variation. Plant it in an area with morning sun and afternoon shade for the best results.

3. Sneezeweed

sneezeweed

Sneezeweed is a fall blooming plant that produces daisy-like blooms that are gold and rusty red in color. These plants are not weeds and they do not make you sneeze, so the name is a bit deceptive, but some varieties will grow to be four to five feet tall. They grow best in moist soil with full sun, and they tend to attract insects and bees to your garden.

See more at Garden Lovers Club


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