Garden Design Trends For 2018

With a title like the one above I had expected to be told about all sorts of exciting new plants and design ideas that we could expect to see in 2018. In fact it appears that the forecast is that we will by and large carry on doing what we are now but with a few variations. For instance Al Freso dining will continue to be popular, but we will do this in a different area of the garden. We will continue to grow vegetables, but maybe try a few new varieties. However this is somewhat unfair criticism of an interesting article from the Garden Design Magazine website which includes some stunning pictures.

Each year we highlight topics of growing importance in the gardening realm. For 2018, our trends emphasize the concept of providing pleasure to people in their gardens—whether it’s growing new foods, providing a refuge for wildlife, or creating a relaxing place to share a meal with loved ones. Enjoy!

1. EMBRACING THE SMALL GARDEN

These days, space is at a premium—but, designers are determined to make even the smallest of gardens useful and attractive. While small gardens are by no means new, we’ve noticed great progress in the way they are designed. In this case, less really can be more.

Here are two popular ways to make the most of a small garden:

Multipurpose Features: “Everything in a small garden needs to have multiple uses,” says Seattle-based designer Scot Eckley. “This concrete fire feature is a perfect example: It creates a bold element that runs through the space. It’s also a curb edge for the deck. It’s a planter. It collects water from downspouts on the house. It’s a seat wall. And, of course, at the end of the day it turns into a fire feature.”

Small Garden, Fire Pit, Modern Garden Scot Eckley Inc. Seattle, WA

This fire feature saves space by serving a variety of purposes. Design by:Scot Eckley. Photo by: Alex Crook.

Container Combinations: One of the best ways to appreciate and explore combinations is in a container. A plant may be exquisite on its own, but its assets can be magnified when placed in a context—with plants that complement its color, structure, or textures.

Fall Container, Container Plants Bob Purnell Somerset, England

Immensely popular in urban gardens, Japanese maples grow relatively slowly and can flourish in containers for years. They dislike being exposed to hot sun and wind. Here they are grouped with greater brown sedge and alumroot. Design by: Bob Purnell. Photo by: Jason Ingram.

2. RETHINKING ALFRESCO DINING

For years, outdoor dining spaces have been conveniently located just off the house, near the kitchen. However, we’ve noticed dining spaces being pushed out into the garden. Yes, you’ll have to carry your plate a bit further, but it’s well worth it.

Outdoor Dining, Garden Dining Di Zock Design Los Angeles, CA

This backyard retreat for outdoor dining draws you out into the garden for a more immersive experience. Design by: Di Zock Design in Los Angeles, CA. Photo by: Bret Gum.

See more at Garden Design Magazine

Feature photo: Debra Lee Baldwin.


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