4 Reasons to Replace Your Lawn With Wildflowers

This will not be suitable for everyone, but in the right location transforming your lawn into a wildflower meadow makes a lot of sense. The example shown here is certainly not typical, but you will see how this 18th century farmhouse looks far more attractive now that it is surrounded by wildflowers. This article by Amanda which I found on the American Meadow Blog tells the story.

William and Ellen Grickis replaced their massive lawn around their 18th century farmhouse with a meadow of annual Wildflowers.

Lawn Transformation - meadow in front of home

When William and Ellen Grickis renovated an 18th century barn into a rustic farmhouse in Rhode Island, they knew they wanted the entire property — inside and out — to feel special. After working with Mike “the Seed Man” here at American Meadows, they eventually ripped out 8,000 square ft. of their lawn and replaced it with a colorful wildflower meadow. The result is a picturesque scene right out of a storybook; a sea of annual wildflowers encompasses their charming farmhouse and each season they add more and more of the annual varieties that have stolen their hearts.

Lawn Transformation - before
The property before.
Lawn Transformation - after
The property after. The meadow features a variety of long-blooming annuals like Cosmos, Zinnias, and Sunflowers.

Lawn Transformation: Why Wildflowers?

There are several reasons why the Grickis’ — and many other homeowners — decide to replace their lawn with wildflowers. Some of the most popular are:

  • Low Maintenance. Lawns can take hours of maintenance per week, not to mention the cost of watering and other upkeep. Once established, wildflowers (especially perennials) require little maintenance and supplemental water. They only need to be mowed back once per year and re-seeded sparingly in bare spots.
  • Aesthetically Pleasing. Although some like the look of a pristine lawn, a meadow of wildflowers is a breathtaking sight and can turn your yard into a photo-worthy landscape for you and passers-by.
  • Less Water. Many gardeners are facing drought and water restrictions in their area. Wildflowers (especially those native to your region) require little supplemental water and will reduce your water usage dramatically.
  • More Pollinators. The declining pollinator population is somewhat due to butterflies and bees having a hard time finding pollen and breeding grounds. A lawn offers nothing to help pollinators, whereas a wildflower meadow that blooms from spring through fall delivers season-long pollen and habitat for bees, butterflies, and other beneficial bugs in your area.

See more at American Meadows


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